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#1 2011-07-29 21:18:20

rankinfile
Moderator
Registered: 2007-12-28
Posts: 843

Our new University

Oh, be still my heart.  An anouncement in the paper the other night--our new university has just received permission to offer a post graduate degree program, and they are all so happy---they have 15 (count them FIFTEEN) applicants--and they only intend on taking 20. 

Oh my GOD,  what an impact this will have on our City--imagine the spin off benifits, the impact on the demand for housing, the hiring of new staff in our downown stores and restauannts......

Oh how I hope our City Fathers feel we are getting our $$ return on our $50 Million investment in the University!!!!

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#2 2011-07-29 22:48:34

Jones
Member
Registered: 2008-01-24
Posts: 70

Re: Our new University

Let's not forget that the building isn't done yet and this for the temporary location on Wellington Street in the old TD Bank/Hotel building.  I look forward to next year when they have a real building and they start the under grad program too, then I will evaluate the whole thing after they have a couple of years to ramp it up.

As an aside, the real money the city put in was $10 Million and they expropriated the Cooper Site, which they should have done regardless of the University to get something real there and to get rid of Ryan. 

Let's give the project time and evaluate the investment after the building is up a couple of years and the university is running, but we should evaluate them on the real $ amount of $10 million as the city investment

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#3 2011-08-11 16:33:35

logicisscary
Member
Registered: 2011-08-11
Posts: 33

Re: Our new University

Nice Rankinfile- aren't you just all warm and fuzzy.  Another of the cynical crowd that doesn't like change I see. This will be a great change for our city once completed.  get us away from thinking Festival and factories all the time.  Good for Stratford, great for downtown, great for the pleibs of the city that hate to see positive change and only think change is building big box stores....  Yeah for us!

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#4 2011-08-11 16:35:31

Cougs
Member
Registered: 2011-08-01
Posts: 143

Re: Our new University

Oh, I think I'm gonna like this new logicisscary person...

wink

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#5 2011-08-11 22:03:40

rankinfile
Moderator
Registered: 2007-12-28
Posts: 843

Re: Our new University

logicisscary wrote:

Nice Rankinfile- aren't you just all warm and fuzzy.  Another of the cynical crowd that doesn't like change I see. This will be a great change for our city once completed.  get us away from thinking Festival and factories all the time.  Good for Stratford, great for downtown, great for the pleibs of the city that hate to see positive change and only think change is building big box stores....  Yeah for us!

Yes, I'll wear the cynic label--but not one "that doesn't like change".  I'm all for new stuff--so please DON'T tar me with that brush.

I'm just a bit sceptical about all the "hype" re the new University.  Perhaps in time there will be a significant positive spin from an economic point of view to the City--but I don't think at the moment it is meeting all the hype.  The proposed building plan looks fairly bland.  The footprint on the Cooper site is minuscule--raising valid questions about the $$ spent on the expropriation.  Don't get me wrong here---the previous owner should have been run out on the remnants of the rails that are left and the buildings torn down long ago---and they are still playing the 'political correct game' of determining if there is any historical relevance to the wreck still standing.

I'm all for change--would have been happy to have seen WalMart behind Sears and saved Millions of $$ in OMB costs.

How about the "intelligent community" hype??  We are 5th best in world (at least this year amongst those that signed up for the contest.  How many here can say they have been improved in their internet access beyond what they could normally expect from Ma Bell or Rogers or any other internet provider.  [well perhaps the hospital and the Dr.s in town have a better network on the fiber optic network].

I'd just like to see them move the yard sticks.  City now owns the Cooper site.  Get rid of the buildings.  Build a bus terminal and get the buses out of the square at City Hall.  But we can't decide that on our own--be prepared for several hundreds of thousands of $$ for outside consultants.

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#6 2011-08-12 12:17:15

logicisscary
Member
Registered: 2011-08-11
Posts: 33

Re: Our new University

Hey Ranks-I agree, the whole 'intelligent community' thing befuddles me too.  Didn't see any advance for the city either on it other than a banner or some kind of plague. 

I would like to see the internet be truly free and accessable, at least downtown for sure, instead of this pay as you go version (which ain't cheap for sure!!).

Cooper site is mired in heritage freaks trying to save a piece of crap-but there seems to be traction to use the property much more in the near future.  City budgets and general economics though I fear are hampering 'fast' progress right now.

No city in Canada or the world for that matter, that doesn't have large oil reserve income, is moving fast on any change right now.  So sorry, we're all gonna have to wait a bit, be patient, push the wagon forward slowly.  In the meantime, support your city, our great local businesses especially our great downtown and keep as much of our money in our area and not sent off to some US city or foreign location.  Patience and persistance always win!

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#7 2011-08-12 15:10:49

Steel
Member
Registered: 2008-02-16
Posts: 2521

Re: Our new University

rankinfile wrote:

How many here can say they have been improved in their internet access beyond what they could normally expect from Ma Bell or Rogers or any other internet provider.

The little bar scale that tells you how good the wireless reception is where you are located...the Stratford wireless network comes in at 2 (two). Barely enough to stay connected.

Do we live out on the fringe of the city...no...we live within a nine iron of Northwesten/St. Mikes.

I tend to agree Rank....the system is built but in true stratford fashion not built big enough to service everyone as they claim.

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#8 2011-08-12 22:47:25

rankinfile
Moderator
Registered: 2007-12-28
Posts: 843

Re: Our new University

The "stratford wireless signal" wi-fi comes out of theose little bread boxes (or garbage cans)on every 6th hydroo pole--the 500M. signal strenth to listen to every smart meter.  Some how, I think it would have  been cheaper to send guys on their apointed rounds with individual readers once a month.  But I'm sure this is a "smart thing".  Now about thoes radio waves.......

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#9 2011-08-21 23:53:17

mr.nelson
Member
Registered: 2008-02-06
Posts: 416

Re: Our new University

Tech savvy Canadians may have only read about Super Wi-Fi, but if all goes well, the wireless Internet connection with a range spanning up to 100 kilometres may soon be coming north of the border.
Approved for use in the U.S., Super Wi-Fi is being carefully considered in Canada as demand for such a wireless connection continues to grow.
"We have already received a number of queries on this subject," said Industry Canada spokesperson Michel Cimpaye in a New Brunswick Business Journal story.
Where was this in my university days, when a poor Internet connection had me parked outside the neighbouring building as I poached their high-speed connection?
Super Wi-Fi is a very strong signal that can transmit through concrete structures while providing speeds of up to 22 megabits per second (up to par with speeds offered by Canada's leading service providers).
Also referred to as the Wireless Regional Area Network, it functions using unused spectrum (or white space) left by television stations that used to transmit analog signals.
Before the digital signal became the television standard, broadcasters required a "buffer zone" in between each channel in order to prevent interference, explains Ryerson University's Gregory Taylor. With the decline of the analog broadcasting era, those buffer zones will soon be "freed up" in major urban areas at the end of August.
Some of the available spectrum will be purposed for cellular signals and auctioned off to telecommunications companies, but as Taylor explains, a good portion will remain unlicensed.
Countries approved the use of unlicensed spectrum for the first time in the late 1980s, spawning the development of communication tools such as baby monitors, Bluetooth and eventually Wi-Fi.
"The previous unlicensed spectrum was very limited on what it could do," said Taylor in the story. "(Super Wi-Fi) will go much further. It will be possible to cover an entire town or region wirelessly."
But as Taylor explains, telecommunications companies have grown concerned with the competitive repercussions as Super Wi-Fi all but eliminates an Internet provider's most profitable service - physically connecting a house or apartment to a network using wires and cables.
Still in its infancy, Super Wi-Fi was approved only last month by the IEEE, an international party that governs such technological issues.
But as the demand and the hype continues to grow, Taylor expects an onslaught of applications to be developed in the near future, a premonition that has him urging the Canadian government to make a firm ruling on how the available spectrum will be used.
"We're stifling development here at this point," said Taylor. "We know this technology exists, but it's been slowed down by an ineffective digital television transitions and a government that hasn't taken a leadership role.


You Can't Fix Stupid!

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#10 2011-08-22 09:37:01

rankinfile
Moderator
Registered: 2007-12-28
Posts: 843

Re: Our new University

interesting....I see little problem with a cell tower and substantial transmitter pumping out a signal that will travel 100km.  But is not WiFi a two way street??  Would I not need a similar transmitter to get my half of the 2 way signal back to the cell tower?  We could pick out those glow in the dark homes by driving down the road, and the street lights dim when they turn on their computer modems.  Hmmmm...I suspect this may not fly.

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#11 2012-01-11 22:01:42

mr.nelson
Member
Registered: 2008-02-06
Posts: 416

Re: Our new University

Universities in shock over research cuts
Schools fear the $42M cut to grants could really translate into a shortfall of more than $100 million Tough choices must be made as Ontario navigates through a global economic downturn, and that includes a $42-million cut to university research grants, Premier Dalton McGuinty said.

The cut came at the same time as the Liberals unveiled a 30 per cent tuition rebate.

“There are some $200 million remaining by way of funds, at least, in these kinds of grant research supports for our colleges and universities,” McGuinty told reporters Monday at St. Lawrence College in Kingston.

“We’ve entered into an era of slower growth for our economy. Our government expenditures must also mirror that,” he said. “We have to put an emphasis on those things we think most directly help grow the economy and create jobs.”

McGuinty said he now needs the opposition parties to support the $423 million annual tuition rebate in the upcoming budget. This tuition relief plan will benefit 300,000 students, he added.

However, Progressive Conservative MPP Todd Smith (Prince Edward–Hastings) said his party won’t support the tuition rebate or the budget.

“The PC caucus won’t support this kind of spending,” he said. “This is a luxury spend on behalf of the premier.”

The Liberals are presiding over a minority government and need opposition support — from the PCs or NDP — to pass the budget.


  Not amused’

Universities say they were blindsided by the move and some grant applications had to be abandoned midstream.

The cut will be felt over the next two years of grant application funding, said George Dixon, vice-president of university research at the University of Waterloo.

We are not amused,” Dixon said. He is also chair of the Ontario Council on University Research, a group representing 20 universities and the Royal Military College.


You Can't Fix Stupid!

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#12 2012-01-12 09:47:53

Steel
Member
Registered: 2008-02-16
Posts: 2521

Re: Our new University

Universities are always in "shock" when governments tell them to figure things out on their own instead of feeding continually at the public trough. $40 million is a drop in the bucket....half a dozen calls to private industry and you could more than make that up.

As usual with the fiberals....make a grand stand about tutition cuts and then balance it somewhere else.....in this case cut grants.....gotta admit ole' Dalt has not lost his slickness......he lost ole slick tongued Wilkinson to sell these things...it will be interesting to see who he has pop up to sell these shell games to the public

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#13 2012-01-12 10:53:15

rankinfile
Moderator
Registered: 2007-12-28
Posts: 843

Re: Our new University

Hmmmm, give a $423M annual tuition rebate to students.  Hmm....what will be achieved.  Students have more money in their pockets to spend somewhere...or perhaps less debt.   Will there be more students??  Resulting in more crowding at universities/colleges, requiring more teachers (helping with unemployment) requiring more building (helping construction) but all resulting in higher costs of educations, requiring higher university operating grants...resulting in higher taxes, getting more taxpayers ticked off.....hmmmm....

So offset some of these tuition rebates with cuts somewhere else in the current budget...research grants to university.  Steel is correct in his assessment...of course the universities are "shocked".  Lots of other pots to dig in.  The tax payers back pockets.

This is a slippery slope, ending in a field of quick sand.

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#14 2012-04-26 21:16:57

mr.nelson
Member
Registered: 2008-02-06
Posts: 416

Re: Our new University

Canada 3.0 message — Canada slipping

Sounding a bit like an annoyed parent reviewing his child's sub-par report card, Stratford Institute executive director Ian Wilson presented a Stratford Index Wednesday that shows Canada continuing to slip in some key areas of information and communication technologies (ICT).

Using statistics from the World Economic Forum, the Conference Board of Canada and the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, Wilson presented what he called "a portrait of our collective efforts in advancing Canada as a digital nation" at the Canada 3.0 digital media forum in Stratford.

The picture wasn't entirely pretty.

Despite an increase in the number of Canadian businesses and individuals with a broadband connection, Canada's overall competitiveness in the ICT sector has stagnated, said Wilson.

Overall, it ranked eighth out of 128 countries in 2011 on the World Economic Forum's networked readiness index, down one spot from 2010. It's global competitiveness ranking was 12th in 2011, down two spots from the previous year, its capacity for innovation ranking was 24th and its ranking of the importance of ICT to the government's vision of the future was 28th.

"Those aren't good numbers," said Wilson solemnly. "I thought we were doing better than that. I thought we had invested seriously and gave government clear indication that this is the direction in the future."

Indeed, government was the target of some finger-wagging by Wilson Wednesday for failing to take a leadership role in Canada with respect to the adoption and use of new technology.

"One of the best things government can do for ICT is to become a model user and to show the real impact of this technology on modern governments," said Wilson.

His criticism came just one day after Industry Minister Christian Paradis spoke from the very same stage at the Rotary Complex about Canada's investment in the sector.

"While Canadians are adopting this technology, while Canadian businesses have access to the technology, we really need from our various governments some serious leadership and some serious support in looking at how we can model and demonstrate the importance of this technology to a modern society," he said. "That's what it's about to be a digital nation."

Wilson also highlighted the importance of arts and culture in that digital nation, suggesting that those things are "fundamental to the knowledge economy."

Arts, and particularly music, have been what Wilson called the "canaries in the digital mine," and have changed and adapted to the increasingly digitized world.

Other sectors can learn from that, he said, urging better partnerships between the arts, governments and the private sector.

"I think what we really need is this linkage between entrepreneurship, technological sophistication and creativity," said Wilson. "That is where we get the winners for the 21st century."

The full Stratford Report, subtitled Arts and Culture at the Digital Crossroads, is available online at stratfordinstitute.ca.

mike.beitz@sunmedia.ca


You Can't Fix Stupid!

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#15 2012-04-27 17:50:56

Steel
Member
Registered: 2008-02-16
Posts: 2521

Re: Our new University

blah blah blah blah......government needs to do this government needs to lead that.....sick of hearing how the government is supposed to do everything for everyone. Governments are lousy at picking winners when it comes to the private sector.....Government can do one very simple thing and those numbers will be turned around within a year and on a continuous climb every year there after....open the doors and let private enterprise do what it is really supposed to do...COMPETE....for the consumers dollar. Instead we hide in the socialist cocoon fearing that competetion will some how be bad....open things up....let the Telus-Bell-Rogers monopoly actually have to complete for a change.

Simple observations tell you whats wrong....broadband costs in Canada are the highest in the industrialized world....mobility rates are the highest in the industrialized world....why....no one is competing for anything....they are languishing in their own little corner and get together every Monday morning to make sure they don't upset each others strangle hold on the Canadian market place.

Why is it you can buy a all you can eat..data, voice, long distance (good lord long distance died 15 years ago in the US...but still alive and well here),  roaming (another thing that died 15 years ago in the US) and text plan from T-Mobile, Verizon or Sprint, for example, for $49/month?......competition.....Same goes for a cell plans in Brasil, Japan and most of Europe. Want ultra-high speed internet delivered to your house?.....$25/month....and it includes the modum!......more than 3 times the price here and then they stick you for a modum rental on top of it!!!

Open the market....and the consumer will not only thank you...they will embrace this sort of technology in droves.

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